Monthly Archives: July 2012

The Right To Video Cops and Security

 

A female officer spotted Hurlbut recordingand told him that he was not allowed to take pictures. Hurlbut took a few steps back, but continued recording as the security guards brought the arrestee to their cruiser.

After the man was placed in the cruiser, a male trolley cop approached Hurlbut, demanded to see his trolley pass, and told him to stop taking pictures. Hurlbut asked if it was against the law and the guard replied that it was. Hurtlbut asked again and the guard responded “It’s against out rights.” Hurlbut asked the guard what law made it illegal to take pictures, but the guartd refused to give him an answer. Finally, Hurlbut shut off the camera out of fear that the trolley cops might confiscate it and delete his footage.

Hurlbut said that several minutes after he shut off his camera, he was approached by another trolley cop who demanded to see his pass. Hurlbut said he produced it and the officer grabbed it out of his hands and threatened him.

On September 18, Ken Moller, president of Heritage Security Services, the company that employed the trolley cops, issued an apology to Hurlbut and confirmed that it is legal to take pictures and shoot video. “We have no right to tell people they can’t shoot down there,” he said. “My officers were wrong in telling him that. And I put that word out as soon as I saw the video. It’s a public place and people can certainly shoot video down there if they want to.

Heritage Security Services refused to release the arrest report for the smoker despite the fact that Hurlbut’s video showed the trolley cops using excessive force.

Sources

Carlos Miller, “Photographer receives apology after armed guards harass him for shooting video,” Photography is Not a Crime, February 5, 2010

Kathryn Snyder, “We Don’t Want You Taking Pictures,” San Diego Reader, February 24, 2010

Videos

Hurlbut’s footage of the incident

News video about the incident

12th & Imperial Transit Center, San Diego, CA 92101

Source: copblock.org

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Los Angeles, CA Police Officer Detains Photographer, Calls Him A “Fruitcake”

Updated Jul 30, 2011

On February 21, 2010, a photographer began taking pictures of a police officer conducting a traffic stop. The officer spotted him and launched into a tirade: “Me, I’m a citizen of this country. I was in the Marine Corps a few years getting shot at for you. You can move along,” he told the photographer.

When the photographer did not leave, the officer angrily called him a “fruitcake” and told him he was being detained for taking pictures. The officer looked up information about him in his computer and informed him that he had unresolved parking tickets.

The officer insisted that photographing people without their permission is illegal, however, he did not cite or arrest the photographer.
The incident was caught on video by the photographer, apparently unbeknownst to the officer.

Sources

Dennis Romero, “Caught On Tape: LAPD Officer Calls Photographer ‘Fruitcake,’ Detains Him,” LA Weekly, June 2, 2010

Videos

Source: copblock.org

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Atlanta, GA Police Harass Copwatchers For Filming Traffic Stop

Two members of East Atlanta Copwatch saw police officer conducting a traffic stop and began recording. One of the officers approached them, told them that what they were doing was illegal, then accused them of blocking the sidewalk, and ordered them to leave. The officer ignored multiple requests to identify himself.

The Copwatchers continued to document the traffic stop and noticed another officer sitting in a police cruiser who pointed his phone at them and appeared to take pictures of them.

The Copwatchers continued recording and were again ordered to leave. They ignored the orders and continued to document the traffic stop.

Sources:

Videos:

Source: copblock.org

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COPBLOCK.ORG – What A Great Site

If you are many people who just don’t trust cops anymore, then you will find this site to be one of your favorites, it is dedicated to holding the cops accountable for their actions as we should.

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Neveda – Nugget Bans Motorcycle Gang ‘Colors’

With an aim at preventing the kind of violence that marred last Septembers Street Vibrations, John Ascuaga’s Nugget is banning motorcycle club “colors.”

SPARKS, NV – Ask anyone who has been around the event and they will tell you the people who show up for Street Vibrations are by and large every day folks who just happen to like to ride.

All are welcome and few cause problems.

But we learned last September during the big fall event, there are elements in this crowd that can be volatile.
Tensions between members of the Hells Angels and the Vagos motorcycle gangs erupted into a brawl on the casino floor. Then shots were fired. One man, the president of a Hells Angels chapter was killed.

COLORS BANNED

In the aftermath, Nugget officials looked for ways to keep it from happening again.

“We looked at shopping malls, public places. We talked with properties in Las Vegas, Laughlin,” says Nugget Executive Vice President Stephen Ascuaga.
The result was a property-wide code of conduct, including a ban on any club “colors,” the distinctive vests and other gear bearing club or gang logos that members wear.
“Really in posting no colors it was an opportunity to say ‘here at John Ascuaga’s Nugget we have a great environment, but here are the things you go by.”
The policy was adopted months ago, but this spring rally will be its first test at such an event.

“We spent a lot of time with the Sparks Police Department how to handle this, how they would support us, but they would be there to help enforce it and actually we have had guests and they’ve been very understanding.”

Out on the street, of course, bikers can wear what they please, but they will be asked to leave it at the door when entering the Nugget.
Others are making their own decisions. At least one other Victorian Square business, Great Basin Brewing, says it will follow the same policy.

Source: Bikers of America

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Street Vibrations Profiling Against Bikers

By now most of you are now finding out that Street Vibrations is now enforcing a “no colors or no patches” at the event and most hotels are enforcing this rule also. I never will understand this type of behavior by businesses and law enforcement who is always behind these types of questionable illegal actions.

This is discrimination no matter how you slice the pie or how you try to justify to actions of a few who choose to involve themselves in actions that are negative but are not the faults of every biker or person wearing a patch.

I am person who rides a motorcycle and lives this style of bikers and club events, parties etc, so I guess you can call me biker, my friends are bikers and club members. When a business, city, event or police department discriminate against people who are in clubs or where certain colors, they discriminate against me too. I am a PROUD supporter of clubs and I proudly wear some support colored patches, so now that Reno, NV (Street Vibrations) has enforced a ban of people who wear colors or patches, I guess I am one of them.

It is time for us to show cities like this how much it can hurt when you discriminate against bikers or clubs by enforcing discriminating rules to not allow us to be free to express who we are. It is time for us to heard and the best way to do that is to not give Reno, NV your money. Street Vibrations has forgot who really makes this event work, BIKERS & MOTORCYCLE CLUBS! Who come to your city and spend their hard earned money.

NEWS HEADLINES:

Nugget Bans Motorcycle Gang ‘Colors’

SPARKS, NV – Ask anyone who has been around the event and they will tell you the people who show up for Street Vibrations are by and large every day folks who just happen to like to ride.

All are welcome and few cause problems.

But we learned last September during the big fall event, there are elements in this crowd that can be volatile.

Tensions between members of the Hells Angels and the Vagos motorcycle gangs erupted into a brawl on the casino floor. Then shots were fired. One man, the president of a Hells Angels chapter was killed.

In the aftermath, Nugget officials looked for ways to keep it from happening again.

“We looked at shopping malls, public places. We talked with properties in Las Vegas, Laughlin,” says Nugget Executive Vice President Stephen Ascuaga.

The result was a property-wide code of conduct, including a ban on any club “colors,” the distinctive vests and other gear bearing club or gang logos that members wear.

“Really in posting no colors it was an opportunity to say ‘here at John Ascuaga’s Nugget we have a great environment, but here are the things you go by.”

The policy was adopted months ago, but this spring rally will be its first test at such an event.

“We spent a lot of time with the Sparks Police Department how to handle this, how they would support us, but they would be there to help enforce it and actually we have had guests and they’ve been very understanding.”

Out on the street, of course, bikers can wear what they please, but they will be asked to leave it at the door when entering the Nugget.

Others are making their own decisions. At least one other Victorian Square business, Great Basin Brewing, says it will follow the same policy.

Checkout the vendor contract for Street Vibrations: 2012.Contract.StreetVibes_spring

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Gov. Brown Signs A Law That Stop Motorcycle Only Checkpoints

Under legislation that Gov. Jerry Brown signed into law today, California motorists can dictate, send or listen to text-based messages while they’re behind the wheel if they’re using voice-activated, hands-free devices.

Brown’s signing of Assembly Bill 1536 alters state law to treat texting much as it does wireless telephone calls now: Motorists can engage in such activities provided that they are not holding cellular phones or other electronic devices.

Assemblyman Jeff Miller, R-Corona, paints AB 1536, which takes effect Jan. 1, as allowing drivers to use the “most modern communications systems and devices while maintaining the safety of hands-free operation,” according to a legislative committee analysis.

Miller contends that Americans spend an average of 64 minutes per day commuting to and from work, and that it is “unfair to require them to be out of touch while behind the wheel as long as they are abiding by the law,” the analysis said.

Other bills Brown signed today included Assembly Bill 1047, to prohibit law enforcement from conducting motorcycle-only checkpoints, and Assembly Bill 1854 to bar the rewiring of an airbag safety system to indicate it is functional when it is not.

Source: Sac Bee
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